Workplace

Is your job making you sick?

Unless you won the big lottery prize or are insanely millionaire, you have to go to work everyday.  A few people is lucky and have a job that they love.  My grandpa use to say, make a living doing something you love and then you don’t have to work the rest of your life.  Easier said than done!

Most people have an ok job, they don’t love it but they are content with it, good salary, not a big hassle, stable.  There are others that wish every day to have a different job.  If they don’t like it, then what keep them from walking out?  Most of the time, their responsibilities like family and/or debts convinced them of keep going.

When the daily struggle is so bad that you feel you hate your job, most probably your health is suffering either from the lack of good rest or from complications from it.  Not enough sleep can cause headaches, migraine, weight gain, mood swings, irritability, tummy problems, poor vision and others.  We all know that stress is a source of hypertension, depression and anxiety.

As leaders we are responsible for the well-being of our employees, not just to provide a safe workplace.  What are we doing wrong that people just hate to go to work everyday?  That is a question we need to ask ourself, a deep analysis of our daily practices, how we treat our employees.  Are we supporting and helping them to be successful on their jobs?  Do we show respect?  Do we care to listen to their concerns and treat them as human beings and not just commodities?

Everyday when you wake up, your first though should not be “I don’t want to go to work”.   If it is, maybe you have to try harder to get out of there because you are letting yourself to be trapped on toxic situation that is making you sick.

Training Program

Why a job description is important?

Whenever you are evaluating if you are a good fit for that position posted on the bulletin board or you have been promoted, the job description is your best ally to learn the primary functions of the job, required qualifications including physical, work conditions and relationship with other positions.  This document plays an important role on your on boarding process and provide the basis for future performance appraisals.

If you are the hiring manager, the job description (JD) will be a great tool to communicate all the critical information regarding the position.  Clear and complete information detailing the responsibilities and expectations of the job are very important to minimize or eliminate confusion and the feeling of not knowing the expectations.  A  JD is also a legal document, you want a well written JD to comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) or in case an employee files a lawsuit.

To ensure the job description is align with the company goals and culture, I like to incorporate it into the training program, being the spine of the training program design.  In a continuous improvement or lean culture, the job description includes the skills and requirements to support the activities associated with it.  Every task needs to be covered during training, this is a good way to ensure the on boarding is successful and show respect by establishing a good foundation for the employees success.  Nothing  better for a good employee-employer relationship than to start with a well designed training created with the employee on mind.

Continuous Improvement

Keep looking, don’t settle!

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.  And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.  If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking.  Don’t settle.  As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.  So keep looking until you find it.  Don’t settle.” – Steve Jobs